Me, Myself, and I

“Me,” “myself,” and “I” are all first-person pronouns, but they are not interchangeable. “I” and “me” are personal pronouns; “I” is subjective (functions as a subject in a sentence) and “me” is objective (functions as an object in a sentence). “Myself” is a reflexive pronoun, so it reflects back to a noun or pronoun already used, either to…

Student and Recent Graduate Resume Strategies

High school and college students and recent graduates often find themselves challenged when composing their first resume, whether for employment, internship, academic, or program application purposes. However, the simple strategies outlined below can help you independently write your own winning resume with confidence and ease. Despite similarities with regular resumes in format and structure—as well…

Resumes, Hiring & Cultural Fit

The need for a career change and an updated resume often results from a breakdown in employee-employer synergy, making one or both parties feel as if they are headed in opposite directions when it comes to vision and values. Frequently, this incompatibility reflects a lack in cultural alignment, or cultural fit, which is also a…

Who vs. Whom

“Who” is a 1st-person subjective pronoun that completes/does the action. “Whom” is a 3rd-person objective pronoun that is the object of the verb (action) or preposition. Here is quick trick to use when figuring out whether to use “who” or “whom”: If you can substitute “he” (another 1st-person pronoun), then use “who,” and if you…

Resume Success in 2017

With the onset of a new year comes a focus on self-reflection and improvement, which for many includes pursuing a promotion or career change. To this end, it is essential to present a professional, polished resume aligned with recruiters’ and hiring managers’ criteria for selecting interview candidates. Here’s why… Resume, Interview, and Hiring Statistics: 5…

LinkedIn Profile Pointers

Do you, like many other professionals, struggle with creating your LinkedIn profile? Composing a LinkedIn profile often poses uncertainty about how to effectively showcase your assets and stay ahead of the competition, which is why many professionals procrastinate when it comes to creating and updating their LinkedIn page. The writing process itself can also be…

The New SAT: The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section

(This is the second of two articles about the new SAT. Part one, “The New SAT: The Optional Essay Isn’t Optional,” was featured in our September, 2016, blog.) In our last blog, “The New SAT: The Optional Essay Isn’t Optional,” we provided detailed information on the essay portion of the newly-designed SAT, as well as…

The New SAT: The Optional Essay Isn’t Optional

(This is the first of two articles about the new SAT. Part two, “The Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section,” will follow next month, so be sure to check back.) In March, 2016, the College Board released a newly designed SAT. One major change that comes with the new SAT is an optional essay. Before this…

The Common Application Essay for 2016-2017: What’s New

  Good news for future college applicants: The Common Application now allows completed 2015-2016 application information to roll over to the 2016-2017 application, including the essay. Students can also familiarize themselves with the application from 9th grade forward, making the process more user-friendly and less intimidating and stressful by the time senior year “crunch time”…

Independent & Dependent Clauses vs. Phrases: Know the Parts of a Sentence

A clause must have a subject and a verb, whether it is independent or dependent. An independent clause expresses a complete idea that can stand alone (example: “Tony jumped the fence.”). A dependent clause does not express a complete idea; although it has a subject and a verb, it needs additional information to complete the…

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