Me, Myself, and I

“Me,” “myself,” and “I” are all first-person pronouns, but they are not interchangeable. “I” and “me” are personal pronouns; “I” is subjective (functions as a subject in a sentence) and “me” is objective (functions as an object in a sentence). “Myself” is a reflexive pronoun, so it reflects back to a noun or pronoun already used, either to…

Quick and Easy Writing Improvements

Whether you are writing for personal or professional purposes, these simple improvements will perk up your presentation. When your writing is precise, polished, and to the point, your message will be better delivered and received. The following pointers will improve your business content, blog posts, resumes, bios, and academic writing. As you will see, most…

Bimonthly vs. Semimonthly

Bi- is a prefix meaning two or twice; semi- is a prefix meaning half. There is debate surrounding the actual definition of bi- being both two and twice, although semi- is always half. Assuming bi- can be two or twice, bimonthly can be every two months or twice a month, which is a bit confusing…

Punctuating Titles Made Simple

Put simply, italicize (or underline) titles of larger works, such as books, magazines, newspapers, plays, movies, tv shows, works of art, music albums, and long musical works. Put quotation marks around titles of smaller works that appear inside the larger works, such as articles, stories, poems, essays, chapters, songs, and short musical works. Helpful hint:…

Compliment vs. Complement

Most people don’t realize that complement is a word and mistakenly use compliment in its place. Here’s the difference: Compliment is an expression of praise (noun) or to offer an expression of praise (verb). For example, “Thank you for the compliment on my promotion.”/ “He complimented me on my promotion.” Complement is something that completes…

Farther vs. Further

Although the two can just about be used interchangeably, farther should only be used for physical distances (think of its root word “far”): “My house is farther from school than yours.” Further refers to additional and also non-physical distance: “Further studies show the importance of studying grammar.”/ “Do you wish to further our conversation tomorrow?”…

Lie vs. Lay

Confused about when to use lie or lay? Here’s the solution! To lie means to rest or recline, like “I lie down when I am sick.” The verb tenses of lie are lying, lay, and lain (notice that the past tense of lie is lay). To lay means to set down a thing or person…

Affect vs. Effect

Affect and effect are often confused.  Affect is mostly used as a verb and means to cause change, like “The virus affected my stomach.” Effect is mostly used as a noun and means a result, like “One effect of the virus was an upset stomach.”

Five Easy Ways to Improve Your Writing and Get Impressive Results

Here are five easy ways to improve your writing. When most people write, content becomes the key focus, whereas style, usage, and presentation— the very tools that prove necessary to clearly and effectively convey the content— are often forgotten. When a reader is distracted by poorly written, disorganized writing, the purpose and message of the…

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